Four months into the pandemic, with Comic Con broadcasting remotely online and Disney pulling 90% of their slate from the release calendar, we take a look at how the industry is doing. Hint: Not well! We ponder the future of blockbusters, indies, Oscars, how on earth anyone will get celebrities to go back on press tours after this, and the fate of the upcoming fall film festivals. Join us as we return to the pit of despair!

Find us on Twitter: @Ceilidhann & @Cinesnark

The Hollywood Read ep. 69

This week we’re back on our bullshit, talking legendary cinematic flops and movies that killed whole genres. Join us for a conversation about terrible movies that failed horribly for our 69th episode (nice). Also, we update the latest in Oscar news as the Academy makes a probably, ultimately, pointless move to delay their ceremony in 2021.

Find us on Twitter:

@Ceilidhann

@Cinesnark

The Hollywood Read ep. 63

We might be stuck inside, but that doesn’t mean the world slows down. Despite the shutdown, Hollywood is busy, and this week we’re running down a number of late news stories, including the semi-cancellation of the Cannes Film Festival, the on demand success of Trolls World Tour, the fate of The Hollywood Reporter, and Bob Iger’s return to power at Disney.

Find us on Twitter: @Ceilidhann & @Cinesnark

The Hollywood Read ep. 54

The 92nd Academy Awards did the unbelievable–they gave Best Picture to the actual best picture. This week we’re celebrating Parasite’s Oscar triumph and Bong Joon-ho’s sweep at an overall uncontroversial and pretty solid Oscars. Then we discuss Birds of Prey’s unfortunate box office performance and what it means for the DC cinematic universe when even their good movies don’t do well. Is it just a problem with this movie? Or DC movies? Or is this superhero fatigue? Join us as we discuss all this and more!

Find us on Twitter: @Ceilidhann & @Cinesnark

The Hollywood Read ep. 45

This week we take a look at Charlie’s Angels crashing and burning at the box office, and wonder what went wrong with Elizabeth Banks’ attempt to revive the franchise. We also discuss Ford v Ferrari emerging as an Oscar contender, and the state of the Oscar race as we get into the heart of award season, and somehow, stay out of the pit of despair!

Jourdain Searles on Marriage Storyhttps://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/12/opinion/marriage-story-kramer-vs-kramer.html

The Hollywood Read ep. 10

THR LogoThe Bryan Singer expose finally arrived, published by The Atlantic after Esquire, or rather, Hearst Communications, declined to release it. Alex French and Maximillan Potter put a year’s worth of work into connecting the dots and laying out the trail of human destruction strewn in Bryan Singer’s wake. We discuss the article, Singer, the system that enables and protects him, and how that system will continue so that people can make money and win prizes. There is also some discussion of the Oscar nominations, which are also tainted with Singer’s presence because Bohemian Rhapsody earned five nominations, including one for Rami Malek and another for Best Picture. So one year after #MeToo and #TimesUp, this is what’s happening. Listen as we try and stave off existential despair and the creeping nihilistic belief that nothing is getting better. This is a tough subject, so be kind to yourselves.

The Atlantic‘s expose: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/03/bryan-singers-accusers-speak-out/580462/

Be Kind Rewind breaks down Harvey Weinstein’s Oscar campaigning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tihITlPAn4

If you are a survivor, and need to talk, RAINN offers 24/7 support: https://www.rainn.org/

The Hollywood Read ep. 9

THR LogoIn 1989, Spike Lee’s masterpiece Do the Right Thing premiered at Cannes, kicking off a year of controversy. Film critics blamed any potential race riots on Lee, the Cannes jury awarded Steven Soderbergh’s sex lies and videotape the Palme d’Or, something Spike Lee is still salty about, and then in 1990 came a truly momentous Academy Awards. This week, we take a look at the 62nd Oscars, honoring the films of 1989. This is the year Driving Miss Daisy won Best Picture and Do the Right Thing wasn’t even nominated. It’s the year Harvey Weinstein flexed real campaign muscle, guiding My Left Foot stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Brenda Fricker to Oscars–something he would lord over women in the industry for decades to come. With Spike Lee once again in contention this year, and up against the Miss Daisy-esque Green Book no less, we examine the narratives and Oscar strategies that took hold in 1990 and continue to impact the Academy Awards today.

Here is Matt Zoller Seitz on why Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-flagellating performance in The Revenant is bad for acting: https://www.rogerebert.com/mzs/why-leo-winning-an-oscar-for-the-revenant-would-be-bad-for-acting

And here is Natalie Walker’s epic Twitter thread mocking film stereotypes: https://twitter.com/nwalks/status/736046606940798977